Inclusion, diversity, equity, and accessibility are central to the mission and principles of the March for Science

Inclusion, diversity, equity, and accessibility are central to the mission and principles of the March for Science. We are an intersectional group representing a range of races, sexual orientations, genders, disabilities (both apparent and non-apparent), religions (and lack thereof), ages, socioeconomic and immigration statuses.

Scientific Institutions in the United States has historically perpetuated power from the high perch of the academy. Often this has exploited the work and lives of women, the incarcerated, people of color, the working class, and other marginalized communities. Systems of privilege influence the makeup of the science community, what topics we study, how we apply our work in creating new technologies, and crafting policy.

Diversity is absolutely necessary for the survival of our ecosystem--and to strengthen the scintfic communities. When science includes everyone, it can increase the capacity for change, strengthen the resilience of natural and social systems, and enhance human well-being. By embracing many perspectives, we ask a broader range of questions, and gain a greater understanding of our many worlds: intellectual, educational, emotional, physical, and beyond. 

As March for Science acknowledges where we have come from, it is even more important to know where we want to go. Recent political actions -- such as gag orders for government science agencies, funding freezes, immigration bans, and policy changes blocking action on climate change -- will inflict the most damage to the already most vulnerable populations. We march on April 22 because it is time to unite on critical issues of education, the environment, and funding research because these things make us better. More than any other industry, science and technology can help build safer communities, increase job availability, and increase public health.