Materials Chemist and Professor of Chemistry at The Univeristy of Washington

Why does Science matter to you?

I’ve been interested in science for all my life that I can remember. I read things like Popular Science and Popular Mechanics, and I was always tinkering with things and trying to figure out how they worked. Advertisements for chemistry sets were filled with pictures of glass-work and all sorts of dripping stuff - it looked mysterious, and that made me very curious, so I started playing around with them, and when I got into chemistry classes in school, I liked them. The challenge of discovery and understanding relationships between atoms and molecules, putting things together - it’s a quest for better understanding of the world around me.

What captivated you about Chemistry?

I liked chemistry classes. The challenge of discovery and understanding relationships between atoms and molecules, putting things together. It's a quest for better understanding of the world around me.

You know, chemistry has a stigma, that it’s difficult, and somehow I didn’t get the message. That’s a good thing, because it’s not difficult, and it is related to so many things. The main part of being a chemistry professor is teaching chemistry, passing the techniques and information on to students. My biggest contribution is trying to help some youngsters get into a field that is useful and needed.

Why I March for Science

It shows solidarity with fellow scientist. We're all in this together, and we're going to stand for truth and policies, whether it's climate change or stem cell research, that most of us believe are valid. We want to be at the forefront of these advances.